1949 Harley-Davidson Panhead Chopper

1949 Harley-Davidson Panhead Chopper

Rootbeer floater

 

Have you ever heard the story about the old lady bitching about some rusty pile of parts that strangely resembled some form of a motorcycle, asking why good money was wasted on such a mess? Well, if she would just hold her comments until the project was completed (which she never seems to wait for...) then she'd see the dazzling custom that's hiding underneath all that rust.

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1949 Harley-Davidson Panhead Chopper

Photo by Street Chopper Staff

1949 Harley-Davidson Panhead Chopper

Many of us have lived this scenario quite often and still never learned our lesson, if there was a lesson there to be learned. But Andy Janzen didn't succumb to this; he went and bought a running Panhead...smart man: Instant gratification. Of course, this is the bike you see here; however, it didn't look like this at the time of purchase. The original bike was a somewhat whiter shade of pearl, with fatbob tanks and other assorted frilly trappings-which at the time probably made that owner happy. But that was then, and now that it was Andy's bike, things and parts were going to change. The end results are presented here (although as soon as these pictures were taken some changes to the bike were afoot).

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1949 Harley-Davidson Panhead Chopper

Photo by Street Chopper Staff

1949 Harley-Davidson Panhead Chopper

The first striking feature that got our attention was the asymmetrical stripe running down one side of the tank and fender in gold leaf. The Root Beer Brown color really brings the sheetmetal to life, while the stripe directs attention to the lines of the classic Sportster tank and English-made ribbed fender. The frame is an authentic Harley-Davidson Wishbone with a constructed Panhead engine, based on a set of STD cases with Truett & Osborn wheels on the inside. S&S; jugs with Wiseco slugs are topped off with a set of STD Panheads. We like STD's Panhead features, like the three-bolt-flange exhaust ports for leak-free pipes, but they also sport the Shovelhead-style intake ports for improved flow over the stock T-style manifold. We have to admit, we're suckers for the Custom Cycle Engineering Finned Covers; there is just something sexy about polished ribs.

 
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1949 Harley-Davidson Panhead Chopper

Photo by Street Chopper Staff

1949 Harley-Davidson Panhead Chopper

 
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1949 Harley-Davidson Panhead Chopper

Photo by Street Chopper Staff

1949 Harley-Davidson Panhead Chopper

Intake mixtures are fed through a Super E with a velocity stack, while burned and unburned gases leave out the back via a set of handcrafted pipes (with some old bends thrown in), fitted out with a set of Superior Mufflers. The Superiors look good, but pack a little heft, so some solid mounts needed to be fitted. Check out the rear muffler mount-it's almost hidden, but carries the weight. The H-D four-speed transmission is hand-shifted, using a ratchet lid and kick started with a bent arm lever using the famous hollow-tube kick pedal. A 1-1/2-inch open beltdrive hooks up through a five-finger clutch hub with an aluminum pressure plate that insures smooth clutch operation for the occasional wheelie or chirping.

 
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1949 Harley-Davidson Panhead Chopper

Photo by Street Chopper Staff

1949 Harley-Davidson Panhead Chopper

A small "Ducky" handle rests atop the hand "Slap" shift handle, while a modified H-D rocker clutch pedal allows left-foot operation of the engine engagement from the mid-mounted, cast-aluminum Anderson footpegs.

 
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1949 Harley-Davidson Panhead Chopper

Photo by Street Chopper Staff

1949 Harley-Davidson Panhead Chopper

We mentioned the Sportster fuel tank; the oil tank is also a factory item, with the clear/braid oil lines connecting to the oil pump. The rear fender is from across the pond (Atlantic) and is the ever popular "hand width" ribbed fender, held centered over the rear Avon by hand-fabbed struts. The left strut is also employed in a supporting role of aiming the taillight/plate mount rearward, while serving as the rear-most mount for the chain guard. While we're back here at the rear of the bike, let's have a look at the rear wheel, a star-hubbed, 18-inch hoop with a H-D hydraulic drum brake that looks good and works well. Moving up to the front of Andy's Pan is a pieced-together wide glide frontend with a mechanical (cable-operated) drum brake, again with a star hub laced to a 21-inch rim. Handlebars are cut-down drags, risers are right around 8 inches in height, with the twist grip and the front brake lever being the only ornaments. The right foot rests on another Anderson peg, which is bolted to a footboard mount, just behind the rear master cylinder assembly.

And there you have Andy's Pan. There are many more features of this bike that will reveal themselves in the photographs, so look closely.

 
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1949 Harley-Davidson Panhead Chopper

Photo by Street Chopper Staff

1949 Harley-Davidson Panhead Chopper

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Comments
4/20/2017 2:44 PM
How much, and where is it?
4/20/2017 2:48 PM
This is a blog post regarding the bike but it's actually not for sale